7 Disney World Restaurants Where the Food Doesn’t Matter

Who needs decent mole when you have a giant Mayan pyramid?

If you want to do Disney World right, the most important personal quality you can cultivate is credulity. To enjoy being there, you have to really get into the spirit of the endeavor.

Yes, it’s a constructed environment, the castle is made of fiberglass (no bricks!) and you’re in the middle of a swamp. But that’s really not the point. Rather than being a cynic, revel in the insane amount of effort that’s been put into the project of making you feel like you’re somewhere else. Believe in the magic!

That’s where these seven restaurants come in. They’re not terrible (we’d never recommend something terrible), but they’re not the very best food on property. Instead, they’re worth a visit because of where they take you, and how they make you feel.

5Liberty Tree Tavern – Magic Kingdom


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Liberty Square is one of the Magic Kingdom’s smallest lands, but it’s also one of the best. Somehow, thanks to the magic of Disney, walking out of Peter Pan’s Flight and into a colonial-era American town doesn’t feel jarring. And what would a colonial town be without a tavern? At Liberty Tree Tavern, it’s Thanksgiving every night. The food is served family-style, you have no choices, and there’s no alcohol. It’s entirely adequate, by the standards of steam-table roast turkey and carved beef, though the “Declaration Salad” is over-dressed with a strange strawberry vinaigrette that verges on cringe-worthy. On the plus side, “Johnny Appleseed’s Cake,” studded with apples and cranberries, is pretty delicious, though eating a pound of cake might not be the best move right before going on Space Mountain.

All that said, the small rooms, antiquated décor, and period-costumed cast members really do make you feel like you’ve stepped into a colonial New England restaurant, and the details are enough for a colonial-era scavenger hunt. (Keep an eye out for Benjamin Franklin’s kite.)